Archive for September, 2009

Guest Post Alert

Posted in Exhibitions, Museums, Sculpture, Wire with tags , on September 27, 2009 by arttextstyle

A SINGULAR VOICE – LESLEY DILL

by Nancy Moore Bess

dilldressblog.jpg

Click Guest Posts tab to read about Nancy’s visit to Lesley Dill’s traveling exhibition.

Lesley Dill (b. 1950)
Dress of Inwardness
2006
white painted bronze, unique
Collection of Karen and Robert Duncan, Lincoln, NE

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Buy a Sweater; Help the Homeless

Posted in Charity, DIY with tags on September 24, 2009 by arttextstyle
I’m no knitter, but I can online shop with the best of them. Whether you’re better at clicking knitting needles or computer keys, you can help Warming Families, a charity that knits clothing for the homeless. For every Lands’ End FeelGood Sweater purchased this Fall, the company will donate FeelGood yarn to Warming Families. Lands’ End expects to donate thousands of pounds of yarn — enough for volunteers to knit as many as 25,000 men’s, women’s and children’s hats. Vickie Howell, the host of DIY Network’s Knitty Gritty, as designed two hat patterns for Land’s End that you can download at http://www.landsend.com/lp/feelgood/feelgoodbeanie.pdf, if you want to join the Warming Families knitting volunteers. There’s also an instructional video with Vicki Howell that you can watch at the Lands’ End/Feel Good website.

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Guest Post Alert

Posted in Bamboo, Commentary with tags , on September 20, 2009 by arttextstyle

Haystack–Renewal–Magic!
by Nancy Moore Bess
Click Guest Posts tab to read Nancy’s Haystack Reverie

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Check It Out: All in the Family

Posted in Fashion, Safety Pins with tags on September 20, 2009 by arttextstyle

The fashion line, Vena Cava boasts fans from Maggie Gyllenhaal to Rita Wilson to the Gossip Girls set. Started in 2003 by a two graduates of Parsons School of Design, who had been friends since high school, the line received back-to-back nominations for the Vogue/CFDA Fashion Fund Award in 2007 and 2008 and has garnered well-deserved acclaim for its “fresh spin on vintage mixed with an arty palette and hand-drawn prints.” Vena Cava collections have been inspired by Japan, Egyptian history and this year, wall murals of South Africa’s Ndebele tribe.

Admittedly, we are not so fashion forward around here. But we do love the Vena Cave blog, Viva Vena Cava at blogspot. http://www.vivavenacava.blogspot.com/ There are interesting textile finds — a Navajo rug, a beaded wall hanging. And lots of other posts of interest, from a Safety Pin Vest (a DIY version of the Safety Pin Camisole from the designers’ Spring 2010 line ) to photos of elaborately carved Sculptures of Cheese. But why did we check it out in the first place? Because Sophie Buhai, one of the firm’s principals (the other is Lisa Maycock) is Tom’s second cousin. And we’re proud. Check it out.

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News Feed: Swimming Set to Decide "What is a Textile?"

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on September 17, 2009 by arttextstyle

FINA, the international governing body of swimming, has banned performance-enhancing “non-textile” swimsuits as of January 1, 2010, but has tabled the determination of “what is a textile?” until later this Fall.

High-tech suits made of 50% polyurethane were first worn in world competition in 2008. A second generation of the suits, made of 100% polyurethane, appeared after the summer Olympics. The material is thought to compress muscle, add extra buoyancy and provide more forward propulsion. More than 130 short- and long-course world records have been broken since swimmers started sporting the super suits. In fact, only two of the current world records were set before their introduction. Record-breaking is likely to slow once the ban is in place. Accordingly, some in the swimming community support a proposal to place an asterisk next to the world records set in polyurethane suits to distinguish records set before and after the suits were prohibited.

FINA has some fine-tuning ahead. Its ruling says that only “allowable textiles” will be permitted, but that term has not been defined. In the art world, the definition of “textile” is quite expansive. Polyurethane would certainly be included if it was braided or plaited or woven or the like. According to WiseGEEK, “polyurethane is an incredibly resilient, flexible, and durable manufactured material that can take the place of paint, cotton, rubber, metal, and wood in thousands of applications across all fields.” Like tyvek®, mylar, fiber optic and stainless steel threads, it sounds like a promising material for artistic exploration — if not for athletic competition.

What Do You Think??

So, what should FINA consider when it takes up the question at its next bureau meeting this month or next? As SwimNews.com opined: “Definition of textile is important, profile specification is important, having no zipper is important. Work to be done.”

Here’s your chance: Do you have any advice for FINA on crafting its definition of “allowable textiles”? Let us know.

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News Feed: Swimming Set to Decide “What is a Textile?”

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on September 17, 2009 by arttextstyle

FINA, the international governing body of swimming, has banned performance-enhancing “non-textile” swimsuits as of January 1, 2010, but has tabled the determination of “what is a textile?” until later this Fall.

High-tech suits made of 50% polyurethane were first worn in world competition in 2008. A second generation of the suits, made of 100% polyurethane, appeared after the summer Olympics. The material is thought to compress muscle, add extra buoyancy and provide more forward propulsion. More than 130 short- and long-course world records have been broken since swimmers started sporting the super suits. In fact, only two of the current world records were set before their introduction. Record-breaking is likely to slow once the ban is in place. Accordingly, some in the swimming community support a proposal to place an asterisk next to the world records set in polyurethane suits to distinguish records set before and after the suits were prohibited.

FINA has some fine-tuning ahead. Its ruling says that only “allowable textiles” will be permitted, but that term has not been defined. In the art world, the definition of “textile” is quite expansive. Polyurethane would certainly be included if it was braided or plaited or woven or the like. According to WiseGEEK, “polyurethane is an incredibly resilient, flexible, and durable manufactured material that can take the place of paint, cotton, rubber, metal, and wood in thousands of applications across all fields.” Like tyvek®, mylar, fiber optic and stainless steel threads, it sounds like a promising material for artistic exploration — if not for athletic competition.

What Do You Think??

So, what should FINA consider when it takes up the question at its next bureau meeting this month or next? As SwimNews.com opined: “Definition of textile is important, profile specification is important, having no zipper is important. Work to be done.”

Here’s your chance: Do you have any advice for FINA on crafting its definition of “allowable textiles”? Let us know.

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Guest Post Alert

Posted in Bamboo, Books with tags , , on September 15, 2009 by arttextstyle
In less than a week, on Sunday, September 20, 2009, we’ll inaugurate our first Guest Post. Our first guest blogger will be artist, author, curator, teacher and art tour guide Nancy Moore Bess. Nancy’s work has been exhibited or acquired by the Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Barbican Centre, London; Szombathely Art Museum, Hungary; the Hunterdon Art Museum, New Jersey; the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco; Racine Art Museum, Wisconsin; and the Society for Arts and Crafts in Boston. Nancy is an insightful observer of the fiber art field and an acclaimed writer. Nancy lived and researched bamboo in Hawaii and Japan, then authored Bamboo in Japan, now in its second printing. The Japan Times called Bamboo in Japan, “a compendium of information that is not likely to be soon duplicated” and “one of the best-designed books of the year.”

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